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Halloween Safety Tips

Halloween Safety Tips

 

October is here, and all anyone can think about is the holiday of Halloween at the end of the month. Kids love getting dressed in fun costumes and trick-or-treating for bags full of candy. Meanwhile, adults enjoy dressing up as well, but they have parties to get to instead of wandering door to door hunting for candy.

 Trick-or-Treating Safety Tips

When it comes to trick-or-treating, a parent’s main priority should be keeping their child safe. This can be a bit tricky as the sun sets and things get dark. In order to ensure that everyone stays safe this Halloween, here are some safety tips to keep in mind while out trick-or-treating:

  • Always make eye contact with drivers before crossing the street in front of them.
  • Always walk in well-lit areas.
  • Don’t eat any candy until home and a parent has inspected it for any tampering.
  • Each child should be carrying a flashlight or glow stick.
  • Face paint is better than wearing masks since masks can obstruct a child’s vision.
  • Make sure costumes are the appropriate size so they are not loose or baggy on the child, creating a tripping hazard.
  • Never cross the street between parked cars. Drivers are less likely to notice pedestrians between cars.
  • Never enter a stranger’s home or car.
  • Only cross streets at corners with traffic signals and/or crosswalks. Always check left and right before crossing.
  • Only walk on sidewalks or paths. If there is no sidewalk, walk on the left side of the street facing oncoming traffic.
  • Put electronic devices down when walking, and especially when crossing the street.
  • Put reflective tape and stickers on bags or costumes when possible to increase visibility.

Following these safety tips should help a parent keep their children safe this Halloween.

 Tampering with Halloween Candy Is a Crime

Tampering with food products in a way that can harm someone is a crime here in California. Under California Penal Code (PC) 347, it is illegal for a person to tamper or poison food, medicine, and public water supplies.

This crime is a felony offense, and can earn a person a prison stay of one of the following:

  • 2 years.
  • 4 years.
  • 5 years.

If someone is killed or suffers great bodily harm from the act, an additional 3 years in prison is added to the sentence.

Basically, no one should be tampering with Halloween candy.

 Halloween Safety Tips for Adults

Not every adult has children who are trick-or-treating that they need to worry about. These adults tend to have parties to go to. While they may not be trick-or-treating themselves, they still need to be aware of trick-or-treaters while driving around. A few tips for adults this Halloween would be:

  • Be careful while exiting driveways and alleyways.
  • Be extra wary of kids crossing at intersections.
  • Drive slower in residential neighborhoods.
  • Popular times for trick-or-treating fall between 5:30 pm to 9:30 pm, so be very cautious during those times.
  • Turn headlights on earlier in the evening to increase visibility.
  • Watch for kids while driving, especially kids in dark clothing.

 Keep Halloween Safe and Fun

Halloween is supposed to be a fun holiday for children and adults alike. No one wants to ruin the evening with an accident of some kind. That is why everyone, including adults not out trick-or-treating, need to be more cautious this evening. By being more aware, they can avoid harming a trick-or-treater who was just looking to get an excellent score of candy to take home.

Do you have any safety tips for Halloween that might be missing from this list? If so, add them in the comments down below. What do you think of California’s laws about tampering with someone’s food, particularly candy given out at Halloween?

Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

California Parole Violations

California Parole Violations

 

The state of California has what is known as a mandatory parole system. This means that any time a person finishes their prison sentence, they have to then be put on parole. When a person is on parole, they may be out of jail, but they have to live a restricted lifestyle. There will be certain conditions placed upon the person that they need to follow.

If the person fails to follow those conditions, they could get themselves into even more trouble. That is the last thing a person wants when they are on parole and so close to being done with their punishment. This is why a parolee has to take their parole terms and conditions seriously.

 Common Parole Conditions

When a person is released from prison, they are expected to follow all laws, more so than other people. They should be on their best behavior, and to ensure that they are, these people are put on parole. While on parole, a person will have set terms and conditions that they have to agree to and follow. If the person doesn’t do that, they will end up in more trouble.

Some of the most common terms that a person may receive on parole include:

  • Being prohibited from accessing the internet.
  • Being prohibited from owning or using a firearm.
  • Communicating with known gang members.
  • Consenting to be searched by a law enforcement officer at any time, with or without a warrant and without or without cause.
  • Having a set curfew.
  • Living within designated county limits.
  • Not breaking any other laws.
  • Registering with local authorities, such as registering as a sex offender, if applicable.
  • Wearing an ankle monitor.

This is just a small sampling of some common conditions for parolees. Not every parolee will be required to follow all of these as some of them are typically only given to people who were convicted of certain crimes.

 Penalties of Violating Parole

If a parolee fails to follow all of the terms and conditions set out for their parole, or they break another law and get into more trouble, then their parole could be revoked. If that happens, the person is put back into jail.

When a parolee gets into big trouble, they can end up at a parole violation hearing. This hearing is a lot like a regular court hearing, though instead of a judge presiding over the case, it is a deputy commissioner. This is just someone who has prior experience with law enforcement.

The hearing will decide if the parolee can stay on parole, or if the parole should be revoked and the person sent back to jail. The maximum amount of time that a parolee can be returned to prison is one year. If the person commits more acts of misconduct behind bars, then they can receive an additional year of prison time.

If a parolee is being returned for committing a crime, prosecutors can chose to charge the person with that crime as a separate sentence. This means the person could face those charges in addition to being returned to jail.

 Parolee’s Should be on Their Best Behavior

Getting put on parole is a bit of a relief for anyone who has been stuck in prison. It means they are one step closer to getting their normal life back. They don’t want to do anything that might risk that freedom. As such, parolees need to follow all of the terms and conditions of their paroles. Failing to do so could jeopardize their parole, which means getting sent back to prison for another year. No one wants that.

What do you think of the parole system here in California?

Is it fair to automatically require people to be placed on parole after being released from prison? Is a penalty of an additional year in prison too much, or not enough, for violating parole?

Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

California Drunk in Public Laws

California Drunk in Public Laws

 

M

ost people like to go out and party from time to time. After all, it is nice to cut lose and forget about any responsibilities for the evening. Often times when people do this, they like to consume alcohol. There is nothing wrong with that. However, there are ways that people can get themselves into trouble with alcohol.

Everyone is aware of the obvious problems with drinking and driving, but there can also be problems for just being drunk and out in public. If a person is so drunk that they begin to risk their own safety or interfere with others, they can get into legal trouble.

 California Penal Code 647f

California Penal Code (PC) 647 is the state’s law against disorderly conduct. This law covers things from begging for money to prostitution. One aspect of disorderly conduct that this law covers under section f is public intoxication.

PC 647f defines public intoxication as being any person in a public place who is under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or any other controlled substance and is in a condition where they are unable to exercise care for their own safety, or the safety of others. This includes things such as stumbling along the sidewalk, almost falling into the street, or even passing out on the sidewalk and blocking people from using it.

This law does not prevent a person from getting drunk while out on the town. What it is aimed at is preventing a person from getting so drunk that they could hurt themselves or someone else. To get to this level of drunk, a person usually has to overdo their drinking. So, in order to avoid getting into trouble a person needs to be aware of their limits and not push things while out in public.

 Penalties of Being Drunk in Public

Breaking PC 647 is a misdemeanor offense. This means that a person faces the following consequences:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

It is possible for a person to get probation instead of jail time for this crime, but that is up to the case judge.

No matter how a person is punished for this crime, it goes on their criminal record. There, it will be visible to any potential employers, which means a drunk in public charge could cost a person a future job. It is really in a person’s best interest to not overdo things and wind up in trouble with the law. 

Don’t Overdo It

Whenever a person decides to go drinking, they need to do so responsibly. That means not drinking too much so they don’t get to the point that they can’t take care of themselves. If they do that, and are out in public, they can get into trouble with law enforcement for disorderly conduct. Nobody wants that, especially since it sticks around on a person’s criminal record. No one wants to miss out on a job because of something dumb they did a long time ago.

What do you think of California’s take on disorderly conduct and being drunk in public? Are the laws too lenient, or are they too strict? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

How Much Does a Bail Bond Cost?

How Much Does a Bail Bond Cost?

One of the biggest questions people have when it comes to bailing someone out of jail is: how much is this going to cost? The answer to that varies from case to case. If a person is tackling the bail on their own, then it will probably cost several thousands of dollars. If the person gets a bail bond from Riverside Bail Bonds, then it will cost significantly less.

Here at Riverside Bail Bonds, our bonds only cost 10% of the bail they are for. This means that when our clients come to us for help, they get a 90% discount off the price of the bail. This can take the cost of a $20,000 bail and turn it into a much more affordable $2,000 bail bond. Who wouldn’t want a discount like this?

Aside from that discount, which all of our clients get, we also have other ways of reducing the cost of bailing someone out. For instance, we provide all of our clients with affordable, 0% interest payment plans. This breaks up the cost of the bail bond and spreads it out over several months.

We also offer special discounts for qualified clients. For instance, clients with approved credit can qualify for 0% down on their bail bond. This means they don’t have pay for the bail bond until a month after their loved one has been released. We also provide a 20% discount of the price of the bail bond for clients and co-signers who:

  • Are union members.
  • Are members of the military.
  • Are members of AARP.
  • Are homeowners.
  • Have private attorneys.

So long as a co-signer meets just one of those requirements, they can qualify for that discount.

While how much does a bail bond cost should be a simple questions to answer, it is hard to give a good answer without knowing the specifics of the case. Luckily, our bail agents are available to offer free consultations 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Our bail agents will be more than happy to answer all of your questions about bail.

If you want to know how much a bail bond will cost for your loved one, call (951) 684-4484or click Chat With Us now.

 

Questions about Payments

Questions about Payments

 

When it comes to bailing someone out of jail, most people have a lot of questions. Here at Riverside Bail Bonds in Corona, we have heard, and answered, all sorts of questions. The part of bail that causes the most concern amongst our clients, is paying for it. People have a lot of questions relating to paying for a bail bond, and so we’ve compiled a list of those questions, and their answers, to make things easier for you.

  • How much does a bail bond cost? How much a bail bond costs is dependent on how much your loved one’s bail is set at. Our bail bonds cost 10% of the bail they are for. This means that a $20,000 bail will have a $2,000 bail bond.
  • Are there any discounts? Yes, we do offer discounts for qualified clients. If one of the co-signers for the bail bond is a member of the military, a member of AARP, a union member, owns a home, or has a private attorney, then the person can get 20% off the price of the bail bond.
  • How do I make payments? We accept a number of different payment options to make paying for the bail bond easier. We accept cash, checks, credit cards, Western Union money transfers, E-checks, and Wells Fargo Business Account deposits. These payments can be made in person, online, over the phone, or even through the mail in some instances.
  • How much do I have to pay upfront? That is dependent on how big the bail is, and who the co-signers for the bail bond are. A smaller bail can lead to smaller monthly and down payments. Having good co-signers is another way to shrink the size of the payments.
  • How much is interest? 0%. We do not charge interest on our bail bonds.
  • Do I need collateral? In most cases, all we need for collateral is the signature of a working co-signer. If we have that, most times we won’t need any other type of collateral.
  • What happens if I miss a payment? We understand that life can get difficult at times, and so a missed payment is bound to happen. If you know in advanced that you are going to miss a payment, talk to one of our agents. We will be more than willing to work with you.

Paying for someone’s bail may seem intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. At Riverside Bail Bonds in Corona, we do everything that we can to make paying for the bail bond as easy as possible.

If you have more questions about bail or bail bonds, feel free to get in touch with one of our agents. They are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and consultations are always free. There is no reason not to talk to one of our professional bail agents.

Are you ready to get started? If so, call (951) 684-4484or click Chat With Us now.

You Don’t Have to Help an Officer

You Don’t Have to Help an Officer

 

When it comes to interacting with the police, it is often wise to do as they say. Resisting or arguing with them will often only lead to more trouble than people want to deal with. So, unless a person wants to end up in some trouble with law enforcement, then they should probably do whatever an officer asks them.

However, California law has recently changed in one aspect of doing what officers ask. It used to be that if a law enforcement officer asked a person to help them with something, such as arresting another individual, that person had to agree. If they didn’t, they could end up in trouble with the law. However, thanks to the recent passing of a State Senate Bill, that is no longer the case.

 A Law from the Wild West

Back in the days of the Wild West, the state of California enacted the California Posse Comitatus Act of 1872. The law was enacted to help sheriffs create posses to hunt down escaped prisoners or other criminals. The law stated that any able-bodied person 18 or older has to help an officer with an arrest if the officer requests assistance from the person. Failing to do so is a misdemeanor offense that could come with a max fine of $1,000.

The law is nearly 150 years old, and that caused some people to take notice of it. Specifically, Senator Bob Hertzberg and his interns. They deemed the law too old and outdated to still be a law today. That is why, back in January of 2019, the Senator introduced Senate Bill (SB) 192.

Senator Hertzberg was quoted as saying: “Thank you to my interns for finding a law that belongs in the history books, not the law books.”

At the start of September, Governor Gavin Newsom signed the bill into law, which officially repealed the California Posse Comitatus Act of 1872. This means that it is no longer illegal for an adult to refuse to help a police officer during an arrest if the officer asks for help.

 The Ongoing Debate

Of course, like with any law these days, there is some debate to this new law and the message it sends. Many law enforcement agencies here in the state of California fear that this bill’s passing will make people think they don’t have to listen to police officers.

On the other side of things, there is the Senator and his team who seem to think that the law is old and outdated. They think that no one should be forced to help a police officer just because the officer asked them to do so.

What do you think about the recent passing and signing of SB 192? Should California have gotten rid of the law because it was old and outdated, or was it a good idea to make sure people provide help to law enforcement officers who need it?

Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

California Shoplifting Laws

California Shoplifting Laws

 

Pretty much everyone has heard of the crime of shoplifting. The crime is often featured in various television shows, especially when teens are present. Despite how it is often portrayed on the screen, shoplifting can be performed by anyone at any age. The act of shoplifting is a pretty common crime here in California, despite the state’s laws against the act. In fact, many stores in the state have to constantly fight against shoplifters, or risk losing money.

In order to try to help businesses out, the state of California has a law against stealing from businesses.

 Penal Code 459.5

In the state of California, Penal Code (PC) 459 is the state’s burglary law. This law makes it illegal to enter any residential or commercial building with the intent of stealing something. Subsection PC 459.5 specifically focuses on the act of entering a commercial building with the intent of stealing something. This is the part that focuses on the crime more commonly known as shoplifting.

According to PC 459.5, shoplifting is defined as entering an open business with the intent to steal less than $950 dollars. Stealing more than $950 dollars is considered burglary.

While this legal definition of shoplifting lines up nicely with most people’s understanding of what the crime is, there is another way a person can be guilty of shoplifting. If a person enters a bank and cashes a fraudulent check, they are guilty of shoplifting, provided the amount of money taken was less than $950. The reason for this is that the person entered a place of business, the bank, and stole the money by means of a fake check.

 Penalties of Shoplifting

Before the passing of Proposition 47 in 2014, if a person entered a business and stole any amount of property, regardless of total value, they would be charged with burglary. However, the passing of Prop 47 introduced the subsection PC 459.5 to law.

This new law separated the crime of shoplifting from burglary, thereby reducing the consequences of the crime. Remember, Prop 47 was meant to help reduce prison populations across the state by reducing the consequences for many crimes. This is why shoplifting got a slight separation from the act of burglary.

As it stands, breaking PC 459.5 is a misdemeanor offense. This means that it comes with the following consequences:

  • Summary probation.
  • Up to 6 months in jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

However, it is still possible for a person to receive harsher consequences for shoplifting. If a person has certain prior charges on their criminal record, then they can face felony shoplifting charges.

These come with the following consequences:

  • Felony probation.
  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in jail.
  • A max fine of $10,000.

 The Difference between Shoplifting and Petty Theft

There is one quick, and simple distinction between the crime of shoplifting under PC 459.5 and the crime of petty theft under PC 488. Shoplifting is the act of attempting to steal something from a store. Petty theft is successfully stealing something from anyone, including a store.

In most cases, a person will more often be charged with either petty theft, if they stole less than $950 dollars, or grand theft if they stole more than that amount. California law makes it so that a person cannot be charged with both shoplifting and petty/grand theft. It has to be one or the other for a given instance.

Petty theft carries the same consequences as shoplifting.

 Don’t Steal in California

Stealing is never a good idea. The consequences of stealing are always worse than just buying the item in the first place. Fines and court fees can quickly outweigh the cost of legally purchasing an item from the store.

What do you think of California’s take on shoplifting? Are the consequences for the crime just right, or should they be more severe?

Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

California’s Real ID’s

California’s Real ID’s

 

I

f you’ve been paying attention to the news lately, you’ve probably seen a story or two talking about Real ID’s. There has been quite a commotion as Californians all begin prepping for the switch from their old California ID’s to these new ones, but why? What is so special and important about these new ID cards?

 What Are Real ID’s?

The need for Real ID’s arose from the Real ID Act passed by Congress in 2005, which was recommended by the 9/11 Commission. The idea was to set a federally accepted standard for how identification cards were issued by state governments. Under this act, certain requirements have to be met while applying for an ID card. If these requirements aren’t met with that ID, then it will not be given the same access as a Real ID.

Starting on October 1st, 2020 everyone, over the age of 18, will need to present a Real ID compliant license or ID in order to access federal facilities and to board domestic flights. This is why these ID’s are such a big deal for a lot of people. Without a Real ID, people will not be able to fly in the US.

Minors are exempt from the need to use a Real ID since the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) does not require people under the age of 18 to provide identification.

 Applying for a Real ID

Not everyone will need a Real ID. To find out if a person will need a Real ID, they can take a quiz on the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV)’s website here.

Since a Real ID is a new form of identification, a person looking to get one will need to bring a lot of documentation with them. Some of the important documents that a person will need to bring with them to the DMV for a Real ID include:

  • An identification document that lists a person’s date of birth and full name. Some examples of this include US Passports and birth certificates.
  • A name change documentation if the name has been changed, such as a woman’s name being changed after getting married.
  • One document showing a person’s social security number. This can be a person’s social security card or their W-2 form.
  • Two different documents proving the person’s residency in the state of California. These must include the person’s full mailing address and first and last name.

If a person already had a Real ID, but only showed one proof of residency to get the ID, they will need to provide a second proof of residency in order for the ID to remain effective.

 If You Want to Travel, You’ll Need a Real ID

Any Californian planning to visit secure federal locations, or wanting to fly across the US after October 1st, 2020 will need to have a federally approved Real ID. The whole point of this new type of ID is to make sure that every state is on the same page and getting the same information when issuing an ID to a person. The hope is that these new ID’s will help prevent people from forging them.

While getting this new form of identification may be a bit of a hassle and time consuming, once a person has it, they do not have to worry. Renewing a Real ID will be as simple as renewing their old driver’s license.

What are your thoughts on Real ID’s and how the state of California has been handling them? Let us know in the comments down below.

Open Container Laws in California

Open Container Laws in California

 

E

veryone knows about the dangers of drinking and driving. Consuming alcohol puts a person’s mind in a weird place. The person is still sort of aware of what they are doing, but they are incapable of doing things precisely. An intoxicated person may see something happening, but won’t be able to react in time, or in the right way, to prevent it.

This is why drunk driving is prohibited by law in every single state. Drunk driving is very dangerous and claims thousands of lives across the country every single year. However, it is not only the act of being drunk and driving that is illegal, especially here in California. There are also laws aimed at preventing the act from ever happening in the first place.

 What Are Open Container Laws?

Being drunk while driving is bad. Drinking while driving is worse. That is why there are so many laws that make it illegal to have an opened container of alcohol inside of a motor vehicle. No one wants someone to grab a drink while they are behind the wheel.

The state of California has several different laws against drunk driving. One particular set is often, collectively, referred to as California’s Open Container Laws. This grouping of laws from Vehicle Code (VC) 23221 to VC 23229 covers every type of situation that might see an open container of alcohol within a motor vehicle.

When it comes to the term “open container,” the law views the following as open containers:

  • A container that has been opened.
  • A container with a broken seal.
  • A container whose contents have been partially consumed.

Under these definitions, it doesn’t matter if a lid or cork has been placed onto the container, it is still considered open. This also means that a person does not have to actively be drinking from the container to get in trouble. Just having the open container in the vehicle is illegal.

 California’s Open Container Laws

California’s open container laws are as follows:

  • VC 23221 – This laws prohibits anyone from consuming alcohol while in any car, truck, or other automobile.
  • VC 23222 – This law prohibits anyone from possessing an open container of alcohol in their vehicle.
  • VC 23224 – This law prohibits anyone under the age of 21 from possessing an open container of alcohol in the vehicle.
  • VC 23225 – This law lays out how alcohol can be transported in vehicles, namely that alcohol containers must be stored in the “trunk” of a car.
  • VC 23226 – This law prohibits anyone from storing containers of alcohol in the passenger compartment of a vehicle.
  • VC 23229 – This law creates exceptions for in-hire vehicles, such as taxis and limousines. Basically, passengers of in-hire vehicles are allowed to drink in the vehicle, but drivers are not.
  • VC 23229.1 – This law prohibits in-hire vehicles from transporting alcohol when minors, under the age of 21, are riding in the vehicle.

There is a bit of overlap between some of these laws, which is likely due to the fact that the lawmakers just wanted to be thorough.

 Penalties for Breaking These Laws

The penalties for breaking this law aren’t as bad as one might expect. For starters, breaking an open container law is an infraction level offense. This means there are no criminal charges and a person will not face any jail time. For these offenses alone anyways. However, if a person was drunk behind the wheel, then they can face DUI charges on top of open container charges.

Breaking an open container law in California has a max base fine of $250 dollars.

If a minor, anyone under the age of 21, is caught breaking an open container law, they face harsher consequences. Breaking an open container law as a minor is a misdemeanor level offense. This comes with:

  • Up to 6 months in jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

Both types will also add points to a person’s driver’s license, which can lead to worse penalties down the line and increased insurance rates. Basically, it is in a person’s best interest to follow these laws, especially if they are under the age of 21.

 Don’t Drink in a Car

Drinking and driving is a terrible thing to do. Not only does it put the driver’s life at risk, but it endangers any passengers in the vehicle, as well as everyone else on the road. One small mistake and the driver could wind up in a horrible accident. That is why there are so many laws against drunk driving.

No one wants to be in an accident, and no one wants to get into trouble with the law, so it is best to never drink in a vehicle, or have an open container improperly stored within the vehicle. Doing either of those things could very quickly ruin someone’s day.

What do you think about California’s open container laws? Is it a good idea for California to worry about this sort of thing? Are the penalties for breaking these laws too small, or not enough?

Let us know what you think about these laws in the comments down below.

Making Bail Cheap and Affordable

Making Bail Cheap and Affordable

 

When it comes to handling large expenses, people like to have options. This is especially true when it comes to bail. Even the cheapest bails in California cost several thousands of dollars. This is well out of reach of the average Californian. Luckily, there is a way to not only make bailing someone out of jail cheaper, but more affordable as well. All you have to do is contact Riverside Bail Bonds.

We have helped thousands of Californians deal with bail since our founding in 1987. Let us help you too. Coming to us for help means that you will only have to pay a fraction of the full bail price. This is due to the fact that our bail bonds only cost 10% of the bail. This makes the bail bond a whole lot cheaper.

Here at Riverside Bail Bonds we know that everyone is different. Things that work well for one person may not work well for others. That is why we accept a variety of payment options. We accept cash, checks, and all major credit cards. On top of that, our clients can make their payments online, in person, over the phone, or through the mail. They can use whichever methods work best for them.

On top of that, we provide discounts for qualified clients. For instance, clients with approved credit can get their bail bond for 0% down. This way, they don’t have to make a payment until a month after their loved one’s release. Some clients can get an additional 20% off the price of the bail bond if one of the co-signers:

  • Is a union member.
  • Is a military member.
  • Is a member of AARP.
  • Is a homeowner.
  • Has a private attorney.

Paying for bail may initially seem like an impossible task, but it doesn’t have to be. Just contact Riverside Bail Bonds. We provide our clients with cheap bail bonds and options that make the bail bond more affordable too.

Do you need bail help? If so, call (951)684-4484 or click Chat With Us now.

Don’t Let Bail Ruin Your Day

Don’t Let Bail Ruin Your Day

 

One call can ruin your day. Finding out that someone you care about has been arrested is horrible. Luckily, one phone call is all it takes to fix the problem too. Just talk to the professionals here at Riverside Bail Bonds in Corona. For over 30 years we have helped Californians face bail. We can help you too.

Since Riverside Bail Bonds in Corona’s founding in 1987, we have helped thousands of clients face bail. With all of their years of training, our bail agents know everything about bail. With just a small bit of information about your loved one, our agents can answer all of your questions. All they need to get started is your loved one’s name, birthday, and county of arrest.

Once our agents have that information in hand, they can locate your loved one in the county database. There they can get the rest of the information they need and find the details on the arrest itself. This allows our agents to simultaneously answer your questions and fill out the paperwork for the bail bond.

When it comes to the bond itself, our bail bonds only cost 10% of the bail that they are for. This means you get a 90% discount just by coming to us. On top of this discount, we create personalized payment plans for all of our clients. This helps reduce the upfront cost of bailing someone out of jail, making it much more manageable.

  • 24/7 Bail bond service
  • 20% Discount
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • No hidden fees
  • No collateral with working signer
  • Se habla Español

Signing for the bail bond is a piece of cake. So long as one of the co-signers for the bond is working, then we can use that signature as collateral. Plus, with Riverside Bail Bonds in Corona, you will never have to worry about hidden fees. The price we tell you is the price you will pay. We never try to milk more money out of our clients.

Don’t let your day be ruined. Make it better by contacting Riverside Bail Bonds in Corona at (951)684-4484 or by clicking Chat With Us now.

Minors Breaking the Law

Minors Breaking the Law

 

Everyone knows that kids get into trouble. Luckily, for the most part, kids tend to only get in trouble with their parents. As long as parents keep an eye on their children, and play an active role in the child’s life, the kid is less likely to wind up in serious trouble. However, that is not always the case. Sometimes kids mess up in a big way, and find themselves on the wrong side of the law.

Finding out that a child has broken a law is a terrible situation for a parent to deal with. No parent ever wants to answer the front door, or a phone, to learn that their child is in some serious trouble. While rare, this does happen from time to time. As such, a parent should be aware of what happens when a minor has a run in with law enforcement agents.

 How the Law Handles Juveniles

When a minor gets in trouble with the law, officers react a little differently. In most cases, minors receive lesser penalties for crimes than an adult would. Still, there are times when a minor could find themselves locked up.

What happens to a minor who broke the law is largely dependent on the crime itself. If the charge is relatively minor, then the child will likely be allowed to go home, or be escorted home. Most of the time, the law prefers that parents take care of the children themselves. However, that is not always an option.

If things are a little more serious, then the minor may be given a summons to appear in court at a later date. If things are real bad, then the minor may be arrested and taken to juvenile hall.

 Juvenile Hall

Just because a minor is taken to juvenile hall does not mean that they will be forced to stay there forever. This isn’t the end of the world.

A probation officer will look at the case and decide how to proceed. The officer can do one of the following:

  • Give the minor a citation to appear in court and send him/her home.
  • Place the minor on probation, which allows them to go home and avoid going to court, unless they continue to misbehave.
  • Hold the minor in juvenile hall until a judge can look at the case.

 Minors in Court

When dealing with courts, minors go to a separate court that focuses solely on minors. If a child has to go to a hearing in court, they could be going for any of the following reasons:

  • Detention Hearing. This will determine if the child needs to stay in juvenile hall or not.
  • Transfer Hearing. This will determine if the case will stay at this level, or be moved up to an adult court.
  • This is the actual trial held in front of a judge, without a jury.
  • Disposition Hearing. If the juvenile is found guilty, this is where they receive their sentencing.

Despite the fact that these court hearings are for minors, they are still very serious. A person should treat these hearings the exact same way they would any other court appearances. This means a person, especially the minor, should dress appropriately and behave while in the court.

 Consequences of Court

The goal of the juvenile delinquency system is to rehabilitate minors and to help mold them into good, well-behaved individuals. As such, judges have a lot of options when it comes to sentencing any minor that is found guilty.

What is likely the best case scenario for a guilty verdict, is probation. This means the minor is able to go home. They just have to be on their best behavior to ensure they don’t receive a worse punishment. Some common probation conditions can include:

  • A curfew.
  • Going to counseling.
  • Going to school.
  • Making restitutions to the victims.
  • Performing community service.

A worst case scenario would be when a judge determines that a child is better off away from their home. The child could become a ward of the state, which is where the state takes responsibility for the child. The minor could be placed into a probation camp, or into California’s Division of Juvenile Justice. Neither of these are great outcomes.

 Be a Part of Your Child’s Life

No parent ever wants their child to have to face hardship, and getting into trouble with the law definitely counts as hardship. Luckily, a child has to screw up pretty majorly in order to wind up in juvenile hall. So long as a parent takes an active role in their kid’s life, they should be able to prevent that from ever happening.

When kids have guidance, they are able to make better choices, and therefore are less likely to end up getting into trouble in the first place. That is why parents need to pay attention to their kids. If they don’t, their child could make a bad choice and find him or herself in juvie.