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How to Get an Affordable Bail Bond

How to Get an Affordable Bail Bond

Whenever you are buying or paying for something, you want to know exactly how much it will cost. After all, you need to be sure that you can afford the thing in question, you don’t want to be surprised with hidden fees. This is especially true when it comes to bailing someone out of jail. You want to rescue your loved one from jail, but you also want to make sure that you can afford the bail.

Everyone wonders how much it costs to bail someone out of jail. Here in California, a single bail can cost several thousands of dollars. Luckily, being able to afford a loved one’s bail is as simple as contacting Riverside Bail Bonds. Here, we provide cheap bail bonds that only cost 10% of the bail that they are for.

With one of our bail bonds, if your loved one has a $20,000 dollar bail, a bail bond from us will only cost $2,000. That’s a 90% discount just for coming to us for help. In addition, we offer special discounts to clients who qualify and personalized payment plans for everyone. We do all of this to ensure that every Californian can afford to rescue their loved ones from jail.

We provide each of our clients with payment plans that break up the cost of the bail bond. Instead of having to pay that $2,000 up front, our clients only have to pay a small down payment and then pay off the remainder over the next few months. After the first payment is received, we post your loved ones bail, meaning they get out before you have finished paying for the bail bond.

  • 24/7 Bail bond service
  • 20% Discount
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • No hidden fees
  • No collateral with working signer
  • Se habla Español

When trying to bail someone out of jail at an affordable price, always contact Riverside Bail Bonds. We have over 30 years of bail experience and we use that to provide our clients with bail bonds that they can afford. Let us help you too.

For a free consultation with any of our bail agents, just call (951) 684-4484 or click Chat With Us now.

The Difference between Bail and Bail Bonds

The Difference between Bail and Bail Bonds

 

If you are like most people, if someone you cared about got arrested, you’d have a lot of questions. You’ve probably never dealt with getting someone released from jail and have no idea where to begin. That is why you are looking for answers online and luckily for you, Riverside Bail Bonds is here to help.

When looking to get someone released from jail, you are going to need to post their bail. This is to say, you are going to have to pay a certain amount of money to the court or jail in order for your loved one to be released. How much you need to pay is dependent on why your loved one was arrested and their criminal record. However, it is safe to say that the bail will cost several thousand dollars, at least.

This is where most people turn to bail bonds. A bail bond is an agreement between a person and a bail agent. The agent agrees to pay the full bail amount for their client. In return, the client pays a small amount of the bail to the bail agent for their services. At Riverside Bail Bonds, we only ask for 10% of the full bail price.

One of the big differences between bail and bail bonds that people notice, is what happens to the money after the court case is finished. With bail, the full amount, minus some court fees, is returned to whoever posted it in the first place. This is not the case with a bail bond. This is due to the fact that when people pay for a bail bond, they are paying for the bail agent’s service of posting the bail for them. That service is completed once the person is released from jail, and so bail bond money is not returned at the end of the court case.

If you are looking for help posting a loved one’s bail, just contact Riverside Bail Bonds. We are a statewide company that has helped Californians deal with bail for over 30 years. Our expert bail agents can answer all of your questions about the bail process and will happily get your loved one out of jail at an affordable price.

We do a lot for our clients at Riverside Bail Bonds, including:

  • 24/7 Bail bond service
  • 20% Discount
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • No hidden fees
  • No collateral with working signer
  • Se habla Español

Ready to talk to a bail agent? If so, call (951) 684-4484 or click Chat With Us now for a free consultation.

Parking in Front of a Fire Hydrant

Parking in Front of a Fire Hydrant

 

Any driver that lives in a city knows the hassle of finding a decent parking spot. This gets incredibly difficult in highly populated areas, such as cities, or even at popular spots in rural areas. If there is someplace that a lot of people want to go to, it is safe to assume that parking will be limited. This can make finding a parking spot very frustrating.

What can get even more frustrating is finding a clear spot on a curb and thinking everything is solved, only to realize there is a fire hydrant. In some instances, people will decide that they would rather park in front of the fire hydrant than look for another spot. After all, the curb is empty, and how often is the hydrant actually needed anyway?

Well, what these people may not realize, is that doing so is actually against the law here in California.

 California Law against Parking in Front of a Hydrant

Parking in front of a fire hydrant is illegal in the state of California under Vehicle Code (VC) 22514. Under this law, no one is allowed to stop or park along a curb within 15 feet of a fire hydrant.

However, there are a few exceptions to this. If a licensed driver is sitting in the front seat who can immediately move the vehicle if need be, they won’t receive a ticket. Cities can adopt local ordinances that reduce the range from 15 feet to 10 feet. Lastly, vehicles owned by, and clearly marked, by a fire department can park in front of hydrants.

While most fire hydrants are marked with signs or a red curb, not all hydrants are clearly marked, and they don’t need to be. It is the responsibility of the driver to see fire hydrants and know not to park in that specific area.

Parking in front of fire hydrants is illegal due to the fact that, while unlikely, they could be needed at any moment. If a fire breaks out nearby, the fire fighters will need that hydrant to combat the blaze and save lives and property.

 Penalties of Parking There

Parking in front of a fire hydrant isn’t a crime, so a driver won’t go to jail for doing so. However, it is still illegal and therefore a person can count on getting a ticket, amongst other things. The ticket will have some small fines, somewhere around $100.

In some instances, the vehicle can even end up getting towed. In which case, the owner of the vehicle will have to pay some fees to get their vehicle back.

Lastly, in the event that a fire breaks out and fire fighters need access to the hydrant, they are allowed to do what they need to in order to get to the hydrant. More often than not, this means breaking the windows of the vehicle to run the fire hose through. When this happens, the driver is left with repair bills and a ticket, because it is a safe bet to assume that law enforcement agents will notice the vehicle in front of the hydrant now.

 Don’t Park in Front of Fire Hydrants

Fire hydrants are emergency tools that are meant to help fight fires. While they aren’t needed all of the time, when they are needed, they are important. They can mean the difference between a building burning down or not. That is why it is illegal to obstruct them by parking in front of them with a vehicle.

While trying to find a good parking spot near popular areas can be very difficult, parking in front of a hydrant is never a good idea. It can very easily cost a person more money than it would have to just find another spot.

What do you think about California’s law about parking in front of hydrants? Is it a good law, or does it need to be adjusted? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

Why Does a Person’s Bail Sometimes Change?

Why Does a Person’s Bail Sometimes Change?

 

Most people don’t deal with bail on a daily basis so it is often a foreign experience for them. Trying to rescue a loved one from jail can be intimidating and frustrating. What can make the whole thing more frustrating is when the price of a loved one’s bail suddenly changes. You were expecting to pay one price, and then suddenly the bail gets raised.

While this doesn’t happen all of the time, it can happen. Sometimes the bail amount goes down, though it can also go up. If the price goes down, you can breathe a sigh of relief. If it does increase, it can be very frustrating indeed.

Bail amounts can change after a person has gone to their first court hearing. This is due to the fact that the judge takes a closer look at the case and determines if the pre-assigned bail is accurate and acceptable for the crime. If the judges agrees with it, then there will be no change. However, the judge may determine that the bail should be raised or lowered.

When the bail price gets altered, the price of the bail bond will reflect that change. This is due to the fact that our bail bonds here at Riverside Bail Bonds cost 10% of the bail they are for. We know this can be frustrating, especially if the price change occurs while we’re setting up the bail bond. This is why you have to act fast when bailing someone out of jail.

We do everything that we can to make posting bail easier for our clients, including:

    • 24/7 Bail bond service
  • 20% Discount
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • No hidden fees
  • No collateral with working signer
  • Se habla Español

If you want to get your loved one out of jail at a cheap price, contact Riverside Bail Bonds right away. Our agents will work with you to get your loved out of jail as quickly as possible. This way we can avoid any unexpected bail changes and the headaches that come with them.

What are you waiting for? You can get started for free by calling (951) 684-4484 or click Chat With Us now.

Animal Rescue Scam

Animal Rescue Scam

 

A lot of people out there love animals. This is why so many people own cats, dogs, and other critters. Typically, animal lovers will do whatever they can to help animals, especially those in need. It is a very admirable quality. Unfortunately, some bad people out there have figured out how to take advantage of that.

Scammers know that they can play with people’s heartstrings in order to steal money from them. They’ve figured out that by pretending to be from a local animal charity and giving some sob story about an animal, they can get people to give them money without much question.

 Animal Shelter Donation Scams

Thanks to advances in modern technology, scammers can get in touch with people through various different channels. They can get in touch with you through:

  • Email.
  • Social media.
  • Phone calls.

Typically what scammers do with this scam is post pictures of animals that are “at risk” of being put down. They will ask for money donations, typically cash, money transfers, or in rare cases gift cards, to save the animal. Many kind people will jump at the opportunity to save an animal and will give up the money without questions. This is what the scammer wants. They don’t want their victims to question or worry about where the money is going.

Scammers like cash, money transfers and gift cards because the money is hard to trace once it’s been handed over. This means that once a victim gives up some money, it is gone for good, and it never goes toward helping any animals.

 Tips for Dealing with Scams

One of the best tips for dealing with or avoiding scams is to never click links in emails. This is especially true when the email comes from an unknown email address. Some other tips include:

  • Be wary of anyone who contacts you asking for money.
  • Communicate with the charity directly, not through whatever means you were contacted.
  • Double check that the pictured animal actually exists and is in need of help.
  • Never wire transfer money ton an unknown recipient.
  • Real charities don’t get pushy with asking for donations.
  • Verify that the charity is legit.
  • Verify the email came from the official charity, not some random person.

 Penalties for Scamming in California

Scamming people for their hard earned money is illegal in California. There are several laws against the act, and which one a scammer will be charged with is dependent on the scam that was run and who the victims were. Due to this fact, a scammer can face either misdemeanor or felony charges.

Misdemeanor penalties for scamming will typically be:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Informal probation.

Felony penalties for scamming can include:

  • A state prison sentence of varying lengths dependent on the actual crime.
  • A max fine of $10,000.
  • Formal probation.
  • A possible strike under California’s Three Strikes Law.

 Don’t Get Scammed Trying to do a Good Deed

No one wants to get scammed, especially when they are trying to help an animal in need. Unfortunately, there are bad people out there that love to get money the easy way. These scammers have figured out they can convince people to just give them money by pretending there is an animal in need.

Whenever a person contacts you asking for money that should send up red flags about the legitimacy of the charity. Don’t let yourself get scammed while trying to do a good deed.

Do you have any tips about avoiding scams like this? If so, share them in the comments below and help other people avoid this scam and others like it.

 

California Parole Violations

California Parole Violations

 

The state of California has what is known as a mandatory parole system. This means that any time a person finishes their prison sentence, they have to then be put on parole. When a person is on parole, they may be out of jail, but they have to live a restricted lifestyle. There will be certain conditions placed upon the person that they need to follow.

If the person fails to follow those conditions, they could get themselves into even more trouble. That is the last thing a person wants when they are on parole and so close to being done with their punishment. This is why a parolee has to take their parole terms and conditions seriously.

 Common Parole Conditions

When a person is released from prison, they are expected to follow all laws, more so than other people. They should be on their best behavior, and to ensure that they are, these people are put on parole. While on parole, a person will have set terms and conditions that they have to agree to and follow. If the person doesn’t do that, they will end up in more trouble.

Some of the most common terms that a person may receive on parole include:

  • Being prohibited from accessing the internet.
  • Being prohibited from owning or using a firearm.
  • Communicating with known gang members.
  • Consenting to be searched by a law enforcement officer at any time, with or without a warrant and without or without cause.
  • Having a set curfew.
  • Living within designated county limits.
  • Not breaking any other laws.
  • Registering with local authorities, such as registering as a sex offender, if applicable.
  • Wearing an ankle monitor.

This is just a small sampling of some common conditions for parolees. Not every parolee will be required to follow all of these as some of them are typically only given to people who were convicted of certain crimes.

 Penalties of Violating Parole

If a parolee fails to follow all of the terms and conditions set out for their parole, or they break another law and get into more trouble, then their parole could be revoked. If that happens, the person is put back into jail.

When a parolee gets into big trouble, they can end up at a parole violation hearing. This hearing is a lot like a regular court hearing, though instead of a judge presiding over the case, it is a deputy commissioner. This is just someone who has prior experience with law enforcement.

The hearing will decide if the parolee can stay on parole, or if the parole should be revoked and the person sent back to jail. The maximum amount of time that a parolee can be returned to prison is one year. If the person commits more acts of misconduct behind bars, then they can receive an additional year of prison time.

If a parolee is being returned for committing a crime, prosecutors can chose to charge the person with that crime as a separate sentence. This means the person could face those charges in addition to being returned to jail.

 Parolee’s Should be on Their Best Behavior

Getting put on parole is a bit of a relief for anyone who has been stuck in prison. It means they are one step closer to getting their normal life back. They don’t want to do anything that might risk that freedom. As such, parolees need to follow all of the terms and conditions of their paroles. Failing to do so could jeopardize their parole, which means getting sent back to prison for another year. No one wants that.

What do you think of the parole system here in California?

Is it fair to automatically require people to be placed on parole after being released from prison? Is a penalty of an additional year in prison too much, or not enough, for violating parole?

Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

California Drunk in Public Laws

California Drunk in Public Laws

 

M

ost people like to go out and party from time to time. After all, it is nice to cut lose and forget about any responsibilities for the evening. Often times when people do this, they like to consume alcohol. There is nothing wrong with that. However, there are ways that people can get themselves into trouble with alcohol.

Everyone is aware of the obvious problems with drinking and driving, but there can also be problems for just being drunk and out in public. If a person is so drunk that they begin to risk their own safety or interfere with others, they can get into legal trouble.

 California Penal Code 647f

California Penal Code (PC) 647 is the state’s law against disorderly conduct. This law covers things from begging for money to prostitution. One aspect of disorderly conduct that this law covers under section f is public intoxication.

PC 647f defines public intoxication as being any person in a public place who is under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or any other controlled substance and is in a condition where they are unable to exercise care for their own safety, or the safety of others. This includes things such as stumbling along the sidewalk, almost falling into the street, or even passing out on the sidewalk and blocking people from using it.

This law does not prevent a person from getting drunk while out on the town. What it is aimed at is preventing a person from getting so drunk that they could hurt themselves or someone else. To get to this level of drunk, a person usually has to overdo their drinking. So, in order to avoid getting into trouble a person needs to be aware of their limits and not push things while out in public.

 Penalties of Being Drunk in Public

Breaking PC 647 is a misdemeanor offense. This means that a person faces the following consequences:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

It is possible for a person to get probation instead of jail time for this crime, but that is up to the case judge.

No matter how a person is punished for this crime, it goes on their criminal record. There, it will be visible to any potential employers, which means a drunk in public charge could cost a person a future job. It is really in a person’s best interest to not overdo things and wind up in trouble with the law. 

Don’t Overdo It

Whenever a person decides to go drinking, they need to do so responsibly. That means not drinking too much so they don’t get to the point that they can’t take care of themselves. If they do that, and are out in public, they can get into trouble with law enforcement for disorderly conduct. Nobody wants that, especially since it sticks around on a person’s criminal record. No one wants to miss out on a job because of something dumb they did a long time ago.

What do you think of California’s take on disorderly conduct and being drunk in public? Are the laws too lenient, or are they too strict? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

How Much Does a Bail Bond Cost?

How Much Does a Bail Bond Cost?

One of the biggest questions people have when it comes to bailing someone out of jail is: how much is this going to cost? The answer to that varies from case to case. If a person is tackling the bail on their own, then it will probably cost several thousands of dollars. If the person gets a bail bond from Riverside Bail Bonds, then it will cost significantly less.

Here at Riverside Bail Bonds, our bonds only cost 10% of the bail they are for. This means that when our clients come to us for help, they get a 90% discount off the price of the bail. This can take the cost of a $20,000 bail and turn it into a much more affordable $2,000 bail bond. Who wouldn’t want a discount like this?

Aside from that discount, which all of our clients get, we also have other ways of reducing the cost of bailing someone out. For instance, we provide all of our clients with affordable, 0% interest payment plans. This breaks up the cost of the bail bond and spreads it out over several months.

We also offer special discounts for qualified clients. For instance, clients with approved credit can qualify for 0% down on their bail bond. This means they don’t have pay for the bail bond until a month after their loved one has been released. We also provide a 20% discount of the price of the bail bond for clients and co-signers who:

  • Are union members.
  • Are members of the military.
  • Are members of AARP.
  • Are homeowners.
  • Have private attorneys.

So long as a co-signer meets just one of those requirements, they can qualify for that discount.

While how much does a bail bond cost should be a simple questions to answer, it is hard to give a good answer without knowing the specifics of the case. Luckily, our bail agents are available to offer free consultations 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Our bail agents will be more than happy to answer all of your questions about bail.

If you want to know how much a bail bond will cost for your loved one, call (951) 684-4484or click Chat With Us now.

 

You Don’t Have to Help an Officer

You Don’t Have to Help an Officer

 

When it comes to interacting with the police, it is often wise to do as they say. Resisting or arguing with them will often only lead to more trouble than people want to deal with. So, unless a person wants to end up in some trouble with law enforcement, then they should probably do whatever an officer asks them.

However, California law has recently changed in one aspect of doing what officers ask. It used to be that if a law enforcement officer asked a person to help them with something, such as arresting another individual, that person had to agree. If they didn’t, they could end up in trouble with the law. However, thanks to the recent passing of a State Senate Bill, that is no longer the case.

 A Law from the Wild West

Back in the days of the Wild West, the state of California enacted the California Posse Comitatus Act of 1872. The law was enacted to help sheriffs create posses to hunt down escaped prisoners or other criminals. The law stated that any able-bodied person 18 or older has to help an officer with an arrest if the officer requests assistance from the person. Failing to do so is a misdemeanor offense that could come with a max fine of $1,000.

The law is nearly 150 years old, and that caused some people to take notice of it. Specifically, Senator Bob Hertzberg and his interns. They deemed the law too old and outdated to still be a law today. That is why, back in January of 2019, the Senator introduced Senate Bill (SB) 192.

Senator Hertzberg was quoted as saying: “Thank you to my interns for finding a law that belongs in the history books, not the law books.”

At the start of September, Governor Gavin Newsom signed the bill into law, which officially repealed the California Posse Comitatus Act of 1872. This means that it is no longer illegal for an adult to refuse to help a police officer during an arrest if the officer asks for help.

 The Ongoing Debate

Of course, like with any law these days, there is some debate to this new law and the message it sends. Many law enforcement agencies here in the state of California fear that this bill’s passing will make people think they don’t have to listen to police officers.

On the other side of things, there is the Senator and his team who seem to think that the law is old and outdated. They think that no one should be forced to help a police officer just because the officer asked them to do so.

What do you think about the recent passing and signing of SB 192? Should California have gotten rid of the law because it was old and outdated, or was it a good idea to make sure people provide help to law enforcement officers who need it?

Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

California’s Seat Belt Laws

California’s Seat Belt Laws

 

Every driver has seen a sign telling them and their passengers to buckle their seat belts. Most people don’t need to be reminded to buckle up. They know that wearing their seat belt is the best way to stay safe in the event of an accident. However, there are still some people out there who need to be reminded of that fact.

In an effort to try to keep everyone safe, every state in the union has created laws against driving without a seat belt. Here in California, Vehicle Code (VC) 27315 is the state’s seat belt law. It lists the times when a person needs to wear a seat belt and what kind of consequences a person would face for not wearing the belt.

 California Vehicle Code 27315

VC 27315 is more commonly referred to as the Motor Vehicle Safety Act. This act was created in an effort to keep motorists safe while driving across California. The act basically states that no person over the age of 16 can ride or drive in a moving vehicle without being properly restrained.

Being properly restrained is defined as having the lower lap portion strapped over the stomach and the upper shoulder portion of the belt being strapped across the front of the chest. Basically, for any vehicle from the year 1996 or newer, passengers have to wear the full seat belt. A person cannot place the shoulder portion of the seat belt behind their back.

Another factor in this law is that all seat belts need to be kept in proper, working order.

 Consequences of Not Buckling Up

Breaking VC 27315 is an infraction level offense. This means it does not come with criminal charges or jail time. A person simply faces a small fine for not wearing their seat belt while riding in a moving vehicle.

When a person doesn’t wear their seat belt, they will be the ones to get a ticket, not the driver of the vehicle. Unless the un-belted person is a minor, in which case the driver is responsible for the child’s safety.

For a first time offense, a person faces a $20 base fine.

For any subsequent offenses, a person faces a $50 base fine.

In some instances, a person may be able to avoid a fine if they can take a traffic school course, provided the course teaches about seat belt safety.

Despite the nature of breaking this law, a person will not receive any points on their driver’s license. This helps a person avoid collecting too many points on their license and the increased insurance rates that would come with them.

It is important to remember that all of these consequences are on top of the fact that if a person doesn’t wear a seat belt and winds up in an accident, they are much more likely to receive serious injuries. Seat belts save lives. By not wearing one, a person is risking their own life.

 Kids and Seat Belts

It is pretty easy to see how seat belts aren’t exactly designed for children. That is why there are car seats built to keep kids safe at all ages. According to California law:

  • Kids under the age of 2 should be restrained in rear-facing car seats unless the child weighs more than 40 pounds, or is taller than 40 inches.
  • Children under the age of 8 must be secured in a car seat in the back seat.
  • Children 8 and older, or taller than 4 feet, 9 inches, should be in a booster seat, or at least secured by a seat belt.
  • Children 16 and older must wear a seat belt.

Failing to follow these regulations can result in the parent receiving fines, and a point on their driver’s license.

A first time offense comes with a base fine of $100.

Subsequent offenses come with a base fine of $250.

 Don’t Ignore the Ticket

With such a small ticket price, some people may feel like ignoring the ticket and its court date. However, that is a terrible idea. By ignoring a ticket and failing to appear in court, a person violates VC 40508. Unlike VC 27315, breaking VC 40508 comes with actual criminal charges.

When a person breaks this law, they can face:

  • Up to 6 months in jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

 Just Wear the Seat Belt

At the end of the day, it is best that everyone just buckle up when they get in a vehicle. Doing so can keep them safe in the event of an accident. Plus, getting caught not wearing a seat belt can earn a person a nice fine, and they will have to appear in court. It is so much easier to just wear the seat belt.

What do you think of California’s take on seat belt laws? Is it too much, or not enough? Should driving without a seat belt earn a person a point on their driver’s license? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

The Law That Everyone Has Broken at Least Once

The Law That Everyone Has Broken at Least Once

With the literal thousands of different laws within the US, and even California alone, it is nearly impossible to follow all of them all of the time. Most of the time, people break laws not because they meant to, but because they simply didn’t know that doing that action was illegal. However, there are some instances when everyday people purposefully break the law.

When regular people break a law, it usually is due to the fact that they feel the law is pointless, or that it shouldn’t apply to them. Many people may argue that they don’t break a law, however there is one type of law that pretty much everyone is guilty of breaking from time to time. In fact it is typically broken several thousands of times a day. This law would be speed limits.

Everyone Speeds at Some Point

Every driver everywhere knows what speed limits are. Every single road in the US has an assigned maximum speed at which drivers could drive and still remain safe. This limit not only keeps the driver safe from himself, but also from other drivers, and anyone else who may be using the road.

Typically, people speed either when they are rushing to get somewhere, or aren’t paying attention to their speed. Both instances can be equally dangerous. In these instances, the driver drives their vehicle faster than the posted safe speed limit for that stretch of road. This may get the person to their destination faster, but it does so at a cost.

The problem with speeding is that it does not just endanger the driver in question. It also endangers every single human being that they pass on the road. All it takes to cause an accident, is one tiny mistake. After all, the faster a vehicle is traveling, the easier it is for that vehicle to lose control and cause an accident, and the more deadly the consequences of that accident.

Consequences of Speeding in California

Speeding has several different consequences depending on how the person is caught. If they are pulled over by a law enforcement officer for speeding, than the consequences will come in the form of a speeding ticket. Here in California, this means that:

  • A fine of $360 – $400 for speeds of 15 -20 MPH over the posted limit.
  • A fine of $480 – $550 for speeds of 26+ MPH over the posted limit.
  • Receiving points on a driver’s license. Too many points within a short amount of time can lead to a suspended or revoked license.
  • Increased insurance rates.

This is the better outcome for speeding drivers. In that scenario, nobody gets hurt. That is not the case for the other possible outcome for speeding, getting into an accident. In this outcome, a driver can face:

  • Varying criminal charges depending on the severity of the accident.
  • Points on the driver’s license.
  • Drastically increased insurance rates.
  • Possible court fees.
  • Paying restitutions to victims of the accident.

In the event of an accident, a speeding driver could be held responsible for another person’s injuries, or death. That is something that no one wants on their conscience, especially for something as meaningless as speeding.

Just Follow the Speed Limit

Speeding may seem like a great way to get to a destination on time, or small mistake made when not paying attention, but it is really much worse than that. Speeding is illegal, and that means that anytime a person speeds, they are breaking the law. This means thousands of drivers break the law every single day, and that is just looking at California.

Increasing the speed of a vehicle increases the chances of an accident. One small slip up is all it takes for a driver to end up in a bad way. It is best for everyone to simply follow the posted speed limits.

Everyone has seen their fair share of crazy drivers out there doing whatever they can to get to their destination as quickly as possible. What are some of the craziest things you’ve seen other drivers do? Tell us about it in the comments down below.

California Has Its Fair Share of Odd Laws

California Has Its Fair Share of Odd Laws

No matter how smart a person may be, every once in a while, people tend to do very dumb things. They may think an idea is great at the time, but after a while, they look back and realize it wasn’t such a great idea after all. Luckily, there is nothing to feel bad about since this happens to everyone at some point in their lives.

One of the best parts? This doesn’t just happen to individuals. Groups can suffer from this as well. This can become very evident when a person takes a closer look at some of the laws here in California. At first glance, most of the laws seem normal. However, upon further inspection, people can notice some very odd laws.

Some Strange Laws Here in California

California lawmakers are people just like everyone else. This means they are just as prone to make mistakes as everyone else. That is why there are some pretty questionable laws here in the state of California. Some of them, clearly came from different time periods with different ideas and beliefs. However, some of them are just weird no matter how they are viewed.

The following are some examples of the odd laws within the state of California. They can be either state laws, or laws from cities within the state.
• No animal hanky-panky. The state of California banned all animals from publicly mating within 1,500 feet of a tavern, school, or place of worship. No one is sure how lawmakers planned on enforcing that.
• No more clouds. Lawmakers from California decided to enact a law that guaranteed sunshine to the masses. Again, no one is sure how they planned on enforcing this law. Maybe they thought they could fine clouds for blocking the Sun?
• No driving for women while indecent. This one is likely a product of its time. It is illegal for California women to drive a vehicle while wearing a housecoat.
• No public bathing. While most people nowadays wouldn’t argue with this idea, California lawmakers outlawed public bathhouses. Now everyone has to bath alone at home.
• No biking at the pool. The city of Baldwin Park decided to outlaw biking in public pools. Not exactly sure why that needed to be said, but there it is.
• Hoomans must be on leashes. Sometimes the laws themselves aren’t bad, just the words used to describe them weren’t ideal. Take for instance Belvedere’s dog leash law, which states: “No dog shall be in a public place without its master on a leash.” It is easy to see what they were going for here, but how it is written implies that the human is the one who is supposed to be on a leash, not the pooch.
• Men must have a sense of fashion. In the city of Carmel, men are not allowed to go outside while wearing a jacket that does not match his pants. Apparently the fashion police came up with this law.
• Women can’t be too fashionable. Inversely in Carmel, women are not allowed to wear high heels in the city limits. The fashion police here really need to be more consistent.
• No gardening while driving. The city of Chico decided to outlaw planting a garden in a public street. They probably meant on a public street, after all, no one would try to plant a garden in the middle of the road, would they?
• No one wants to see/smell that. The city of Dana Point made it illegal for a person to use their restroom if the window is open. At the time of its inception, this law was likely considered a great public service.

These Aren’t Taken Seriously

This is just a small sample of some of the oddest laws here within the state of California. While many of these are laws, but most aren’t taken seriously. This means that no one really has to worry about getting ticketed for driving while wearing a housecoat, or walking outside with clothes that don’t match.